Cristina congratulates Barack

President Cristina Kirchner was quick to congratulate president-elect Barack Obama on Wednesday, sending a letter that read “many will congratulate you for having been able to interpret the hopes and dreams of the American people. I join them in these more than deserved demonstrations of admiration. Nonetheless, this new epoch that begins today in your country is, more than anything, a great moment in epic struggle against discrimination…”

The letter, which was extremely warm, betrays CFK’s hopes that the tide of history is turning her way: neo-liberal capitalism is falling and an ex-activist – a black one, at that – has made it to the White House. After taking office in 2003, her husband Nestor Kirchner began by stablising the turbulent Argentine economy – which was growing rapidly due to the high prices the country’s agricultural products were fetching in a food-hungry market – then started taking up the leftist rhetoric of some of his neighbours and allies.

Cristina casts herself as a modern-day Evita – ex-student activist, defender of the poor and anti-US imperialist (and although experts say poverty has increased under the Kirchners the government manipulates official statistics to match its narrative). The Kirchners have taken up the cause of those who wish to see the crimes of the Dirty War punished, and courts are convicting and jailing ex-military repressors on a regular basis.

Her letter likens the struggle of her generation’s activists against the country’s military dictators – and the high price it paid (around 30,000 Argentines were killed during the 70s and 80s) – to the civil rights movement in the US.

This communion of sacrifice and rebellion, of solidarity and respect for justice, is what you will find in my government and and its people in our decision to advance, without rest, towards a more free and just world.

The Kirchners are from the Peronist party, whose traditions are populist and authoritarian but which delivered hard-fought rights to Argentina’s workers and usually counts on the country’s unions and urban masses for support. The Kirchners have abused the IMF for its role in imposing neo-liberal policies in exchange for loans, which most Argentines and many economists agree helped aggravate the country’s 2001 currency crisis. In a recent address to the UN general assembly, CFK defended the role of the state in the wake of the US financial crisis, and her latest move in that direction is a controversial plan to nationalise the country’s private retirement funds.

Each day we must confront many great challenges. At the moment, the world economic crisis that is unfolding with the destructive speed of an epidemic demands audacious and innovative solutions, but also, collective action.

In this way, just as those who confronted a world war understood the importance of multilateralism, so must we, with the same nobleness and intelligence, make urgent and necessary changes to create a multilateralism that might respond to the complexities of our distinct realities.

We have a great opportunity to eradicate poverty, discrimination and inequality in our societies. As you said in your campaign, to achieve this we need better education, health and opportunities. And, without doubt, more dialogue between leaders and their people.

I know we can count on you, and I want you to know that you can count on my sincere friendship.

DR. CRISTINA FERNANDEZ

President of Argentina

Fernandez de Kirchner will soon head to Washington to the G-20 meeting Bush has convened to discuss the world economic crisis. It remains to be seen whether she and Obama see quite so eye-to-eye as she seems to imagine.